Purple Hibiscus review

Written by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

A painfully dark story that lingers, not in the background, but right in your face even after you decide to close the pages and go back to life.

But that’s exactly what a well-written book does to its reader, does it not?

Even when you want to break away from the narrative to take a break, breathe and gather yourself for the next chapter, you just cannot. At least I couldn’t.

I believe that is also the reason why I finished the book in a couple of days as I didn’t want to feel the churning in the pit of my stomach for more days than that.

You just want to know. You want to know where and when and how this ordeal of a story ends, if it does.

The plot is tragic, not in the matter of fact way that a lot of them are. This one has waves of tragedy, waves that come too often to the shore to shake you, stir you and not let you settle.

Despite so many cultural references, I found it so easy to imagine the life led by the characters.

I could, in my mind, paint a vivid picture of everything that was unfolding and yet, I longed to know Nigeria (the setting of the novel) better.

It is the brilliance of the author’s words that you almost ache to see the dusty roads, the faded signages, the cramped apartments, the lavish mansion, and the dresses worn by the ladies of the book.

I will not share any spoilers at all so that the reader can enjoy this one thoroughly.

The simplicity of using a language has always fascinated me more than employing the complexity of it to narrate any story. This could be why I am always drawn to writers who are so simple in their writing style that the brilliance they create out of it is simply astounding.

For Purple Hibiscus, the simplicity of the writing and the complexity of the story is what stays with you.

In the end, I must warn the reader that this one is a dark story that you might want to avoid if already struggling with demons of any kind.

Pick it up when you’re ready to read something that stirs you inside.

For those who do decide to read this one, I hope, just like me, you’re not able to detach yourself from the pages for too long and finish reading this one in one sitting!

Happy Reading! ❤️

Let’s engage at anoushkabhartia@gmail.com

Written by

Writer. Buddhist. Feminist. Looking for freelance projects.

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